Rosso di Toscana IGT 2012

Santa Martina

Rosso di Toscana IGT 2012 play

Region: Italy / Tuscany
Grapes: Sangiovese, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah

Grapes are grown in the Chianti and Maremma regions according to the soil type best suited to each grape variety. Chianti Classico soils, with their higher clay content, are well suited to Sangiovese, while Maremma’s unique climate and sandy soils are optimal for Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah. The grapes are carefully blended by Ambrogio e Giovanni Folonari in Greve, Chianti, to balance the wine’s characters of earthiness and acidity. The wine was fermented and aged in temperature-controlled stainless steel tanks to enhance the fruit aromas.

89 Points

Wine Spectator

2012 vintage
89 Points

Wine Spectator

2012 vintage
view all press reviews

harvest note

The 2012 season began with a rather dry winter, following the tendency of the previous year in which recorded precipitation was lower than the annual average. Regarding rainfall distribution, autumn/winter 2011/2012 saw extremely modest precipitation in October and December, and there was practically no rainfall at all in November 2011 and in January 2012. February's snowfalls, notably abundant in some areas, were not enough to make up for the preceding deficit in rainfall. The month of March was almost entirely without rainfall, and the temperatures were mild: these conditions led to the bud break occurring slightly earlier than anticipated, between the end of March and the first ten days of April in all the vine varieties. There were more significant precipitations in the months of April and May, ensuring that the plants had enough water to draw on. From a temperature point of view, April and May were rather cool. The summer began with above average temperatures for the time of year, continuing the tendency towards dry and torrid weather conditions. The first signs of water stress were already being observed in June in some areas, slowing down the development of the vegetative wall. The onset of ripening of some grapes was first noted in the last days of July. The ripening process then slowed owing to the high temperatures and dryness. The rains didn't come back until the last days of August, and they continued into September. This allowed for a good final ripening of the grapes, and partial replenishment of the water reserves in the soil. The weather conditions meant that vines in some areas displayed evident signs of distress, while in other areas the effects were less notable, depending on the agricultural practices adopted, and on the water capacity of the soil. Notwithstanding the prolonged heat, the grapes didn't suffer from any noticeable burn damage, thanks to the absence of any particularly high peak temperatures. The weight of the harvested grapes was lower than usual, owing to the general lack of water, and the skin/pulp ratio was higher, meaning that less must was produced. This was the most evident consequence of the year's particularly dry weather. This has led to a reduced production of grapes per plant, resulting in the expected increase in the qualitative levels of the grapes and musts - reduced production is associated with an increase in the quality of the grape. No particular problems were observed from a phytopathological point of view.

tasting note

The wine has ripe, crushed red cherry aromas and flavors with an earthy note. Food-friendly acidity and fine tannins balance the wine’s full-bodied, juicy fruit character.

food pairing

Pairs with pasta and tomato-based sauces, pizza, cured meats and young or earthy cheeses.

technical data

GRAPES: Sangiovese, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah
APPELLATION: Rosso di Toscana IGT
PH: 3.66
ACIDITY: 5.67
ABV: 13.50%

points of distinction

  • A “Baby Super Tuscan” at an everyday price
  • An international blend of Sangiovese, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah
  • about the grape +
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This gutsy Tuscan red is made by a family with centuries of winemaking tradition, but its spice and taste is distinctively modern Italian.

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